Said…Unsaid

Don’t say true things if they’re not nice
Don’t say nice things if they’re not true”
— From a San­skrit Sub­hashita (via Navin Kabra)

(The wis­dom in the above sub­hashita is good as a gen­er­al guid­ing prin­ci­ple, but I do not think it should be uni­ver­sal­ly prac­ticed in all cir­cum­stances. Some­times, as a friend, one should say true things even if they’re not nice.)

Some­times, I regret what I said.
Some­times, I regret what I did not say.

Say­ing some­thing some­times requires courage.
Not say­ing some­thing some­times requires even greater courage.

Most peo­ple are judged by what they say.
Very few are judged by what they did not say.

His­to­ry remem­bers you by what you said.
No one remem­bers you by what you did not say.

What you say is a quick, direct, reflec­tion of who you are.
What you do not say is a dif­fi­cult, indi­rect, reflec­tion of who you are.

What you say is often not a true reflec­tion of who you are.
What you do not say is often a very true reflec­tion of who you are.

Say­ing often eas­es fur­ther com­mu­ni­ca­tion, but some­times, it also impedes it.
Leav­ing some­thing unsaid some­times eas­es fur­ther com­mu­ni­ca­tion.

The fool is one who is iden­ti­fied by what he said.
The wise one is who remains uniden­ti­fied by what he did not say.

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  • Well said. Also, well unsaid! 🙂

    • I don’t think there can be a bet­ter com­ment than this! 🙂 Thank you.

  • Ganesh

    Leav­ing some­thing unsaid some­times eas­es fur­ther com­mu­ni­ca­tion”. A recipe that holds true for suc­cess­ful rela­tion­ships.

    • Even pro­fes­sion­al­ly. And hence, can lead to so-called “suc­cess­ful careers”.